Working together from the very start

Before the Christmas break the computerlovers shared an article around the office that really resonated with the Code approach; it highlighted the benefits of ensuring developer involvement during the early stages of a project. This is something we believe is integral at the start of any project, no matter how big or small; we are passionate about working together as we believe this is when we generate the best ideas. Here is why:

More specialists -- the earlier the better

Having cross-discipline input at the beginning of a project makes it easier to identify conflicts between design and technology and iron these out before a project goes into production. This enables everyone to feed into the process, helping avoid issues whilst identifying opportunities for improvement. And that's not restricted to development vs. creative --that's a conversation that should include the SEO team, User Experience Architects and Content Strategists too.

Cross-platform makes life increasingly complex, so collaboration's even more vital

The user has moved from the desktop and now has multiple devices and touches the brand at different times and in different places, meaning the context of user behaviour is now much more complex and demands simple and beautiful solutions to make this look seamless.

With an increase in mobile browsing, responsive design seems to be the de-facto standard when it comes to new site builds, so it's important to get the definition nailed from the outset.

Navigation -- more specifically 'mega navs' -- Carousels and Overlays are all thingswe've come to accept on the desktop, but it's important to consider how that content should be altered for mobiles and tablets.

Involving the developer in the initial stages of a project allows for these technical questions to be raised, and for appropriate solutions to be processed, whilst ensuring the website is as optimised as possible for the device.

17_responsive _web _1

Recently we've launched the new BettaLiving website and, upon reflection, the project team felt that the involvement of all the core disciplines right at the beginning was a key driver of success. For example, during the concept stage the team got together to share layout and interaction ideas for the main pages, discussing and debating them until a solution was agreed (which was then iterated and improved upon during development of course!). This helped shape both the wider structure of the site (building pages out of components rather than whole templates) and some of the nitty- gritty details too (like the bouncing 'see more' boxes for example).

We cannot stress enough the importance of working collaboratively, not only to make the overall project run more smoothly but to ensure that the best end user experience is delivered -- after all, two or more minds are better than one.

Before the Christmas break the computerlovers shared an article around the office that really resonated with the Code approach; it highlighted the benefits of ensuring developer involvement during the early stages of a project. This is something we believe is integral at the start of any project, no matter how big or small; we are passionate about working together as we believe this is when we generate the best ideas. Here is why:

More specialists -- the earlier the better

Having cross-discipline input at the beginning of a project makes it easier to identify conflicts between design and technology and iron these out before a project goes into production. This enables everyone to feed into the process, helping avoid issues whilst identifying opportunities for improvement. And that's not restricted to development vs. creative --that's a conversation that should include the SEO team, User Experience Architects and Content Strategists too.

Cross-platform makes life increasingly complex, so collaboration's even more vital

The user has moved from the desktop and now has multiple devices and touches the brand at different times and in different places, meaning the context of user behaviour is now much more complex and demands simple and beautiful solutions to make this look seamless.

With an increase in mobile browsing, responsive design seems to be the de-facto standard when it comes to new site builds, so it's important to get the definition nailed from the outset.

Navigation -- more specifically 'mega navs' -- Carousels and Overlays are all things we've come to accept on the desktop, but it's important to consider how that content should be altered for mobiles and tablets.

Involving the developer in the initial stages of a project allows for these technical questions to be raised, and for appropriate solutions to be processed, whilst ensuring the website is as optimised as possible for the device.

Recently we've launched the new BettaLiving website and, upon reflection, the project team felt that the involvement of all the core disciplines right at the beginning was a key driver of success. For example, during the concept stage the team got together to share layout and interaction ideas for the main pages, discussing and debating them until a solution was agreed (which was then iterated and improved upon during development of course!). This helped shape both the wider structure of the site (building pages out of components rather than whole templates) and some of the nitty- gritty details too (like the bouncing 'see more' boxes for example).

We cannot stress enough the importance of working collaboratively, not only to make the overall project run more smoothly but to ensure that the best end user experience is delivered -- after all, two or more minds are better than one.- See more at: http://blog.codecomputerlove.com/2013/01/18/working-together-from-the-very-start/#sthash.bkswqNwj.dpuf


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